Planned

:tools:

Previous day correlations

There are often things that affect me the next day that would we great to see included in correlations. For example, eating junk food one day could result in fewer steps the next day; or seeing my weight went down only because I didn’t drink much water the day before. This would be especially useful for me tracking streaks and what harms/helps with forming habits.

90 votes

Tagged as Development

Suggested 01 August 2017 by user James Wilcox

Moved into Planned 28 December 2017

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  • avatar
    Josh Sharp

    Agreed! This is another task in our huge backlog that we’ve been hoping to get around to eventually. Maybe once custom tracking is out :) I agree it should make a difference in predicting how behaviours affect one another across more than one day.

    01 August 2017
  • avatar
    Nicole Ross

    This would be amazing!

    02 September 2017
  • avatar
    Seth Sternberg

    His would be huge! So many things affect you the next day, but even just knowing how the previous night’s sleep affects your day is worth the effort.

    17 September 2017
  • avatar
    Rob Di Toro

    This is the biggest thing for me for sure. Got only 5hrs sleep last night, or haven’t worked out all week? Doesn’t matter how much I exercise or what I ate today Going to be a terrible day.

    06 October 2017
  • avatar
    Annika

    This would be the biggest thing for me too!

    12 November 2017
  • avatar
    Oiseau Bleu

    agreed, would be nice indeed !

    26 November 2017
  • avatar
    Olli Tiainen

    A big one. The results we get tomorrow are almost always the result of what happens today. Exercise, sleep, nutrition, alcohol, productivity, etc.

    13 February
  • avatar
    Mazdak Momen

    Maybe this would be a separate feature request/suggestion, could this go beyond the previous day? Maybe like a few days back? I ask because I’ve heard of cases where there is a delayed allergic reaction to foods and I’ve personally had this happen with a bee sting. Sometimes it’s not obvious to go back and connect it with something that happened, for example, 3 days before. And I imagine the use-case could extend beyond food.

    25 February
  • avatar
    Aaron Parecki

    I’d love to see this as well! Tho I don’t really need the app to tell me that when I have a lot of drinks the day before then I have a slow/unproductive day the next day. I would be curious to see if there’s a correlation between active time and productivity, or between coffee/alcohol and sleep quality.

    27 April
  • avatar
    John Eder

    It might be interesting to call this something like “deep analysis” and just have it running when the load on the server is low. Then surprise people with longer term correlations, but focused around the more useful use cases described above versus just going after every possible correlation (which would cut down on noise and save processor time).

    Of course if the correlation was too difficult to make, or user’s questions became too annoying, then the answer could come back with error code 42… (See Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: Deep Thought for more on this).

    27 April
  • avatar
    Bjarke Freund-Hansen

    I believe you should do a proper cross correlation on the time-series data. Such that you can look for peaks in the cross correlation result at any time offset, not just at 0 and +/- 1 day.

    04 May
  • avatar
    Josh Sharp

    Because correlations are pre-computed this isn’t really possible, and off the top of my head I don’t see the value in correlating daily values with large offsets. “You get more sleep when you walked more 5 days ago”? I suspect any results would be fairly spurious.

    05 May
  • avatar
    Kathleen Bennallack

    I think a lot of them probably would be spurious, but for example, tracking migraine triggers usually involves up to a 72 hour offset (e.g. sleeping in might result in a migraine up to 3 days later) so in some cases it could be really useful as a long-term pattern.

    06 May
  • avatar
    Josh Sharp

    Ah, that’s an interesting example!

    07 May
  • avatar
    Olli Tiainen

    The migrane example is a great one. I also believe that more frequently previous day correlation use cases exist in the form of “When I don’t do X for Y days, Z happens” i.e cumulation of positive and negative effects. For example: When I don’t exercise for 3 days, I sleep worse. When I don’t sleep well for 3 days, I am fairly unproductive. Etc. Etc. I believe correlations between large offsets are fairly rare, but cumulative effects of doing / not doing something is very common.

    08 May
  • avatar
    John Eder

    I know very little about the technical side of the correlations on this, so take my thoughts with a few grains of salt…

    If the cumulative effects are common, then these are perhaps worthy of automation /codification, and only the large-offsets of particular significance, like the migraine example could be handled as one-offs specialized searches to avoid a flood of random correlations with no meaning (I.e. noise)…

    I wonder if having a way to “deprioritize” a particular correlation that comes out of the engine would be a useful approach to cutting down noise. Say the engine finds a correlation between getting steps and a higher heart rate (seems a bit redundent) – then it would just tuck the correlation down at the bottom of the page and not include it in any emails, etc…

    My bigger thought with all of this is to ensure the usefulness of any new features increase the balance of useful information and cuts down on noise that would lead to people not using the tool. All of us in here may have a bit higher tolerances for noise as we are avid enough users to be thinking and responding to feature ideas here…

    08 May
  • avatar
    Josh Sharp

    Yes there will be a way to flag correlations as not useful and hide them.

    09 May
  • avatar
    Rob Di Toro

    Further to @John Eder’s comment –

    Not only would deprioritization be handy, we should be able to opt-in to tracking across previous days per each custom tag/metric.

    Eg: ☑️ previous day correlation – worked late and today correlation – productivity metric

    That way we don’t have to go through all of the correlations that pop up for previous days and remove the ones we don’t want (number of emails sent yesterday + steps today) – but rather track the ones we do.

    10 May